<p>Selling to kids is always a hot topic, and the gaming industry is no exception. With the discussions of games geared toward them and monetizing said games, I would like to know your professional opinion on the topic. Thanks for answering!</p>

<p>Selling to kids is always a hot topic, and the gaming industry is no exception. With the discussions of games geared toward them and monetizing said games, I would like to know your professional opinion on the topic. Thanks for answering!</p>

What most game publishers and developers want is steady and reliable earnings over time. It is much more expensive to build and market a brand new game and sell it than it is to continue development and marketing for an existing game with an existing regular player base. This is why most large game launches are expected to get continued monetization and development support for at least a year after launch, with many hoping to continue updating and monetizing for years beyond that. We want to continue developing and adding content to the games people want to keep playing. 

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This means that one-time single customers are not our primary target audience. What we want are repeat customers – players who enjoy the the things they buy enough to keep buying additional things as we release them. We generally hope to do this by providing them enough value in the things they buy that they feel like they got their money’s worth. This encourages them to buy more in the future – the things they get for the money are worth it to them. It forms a virtuous cycle – players give us money because they feel they are getting value for it, we spend the money to develop new and engaging content for them to play with.

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When it comes to marketing and selling to children, what we want is still the same thing – steady and reliable customers. This means that we actually don’t want kids stealing their parents’ credit cards and running up huge bills only to get them reversed later – that’s not a reliable or steady income stream for us. In those situations, our customer service reps typically give the customers (parents) a grace period of like 1-3 months to ask for refunds because unhappy customers are not repeat customers. This generally means we want both parents and kids have a good time with our game – parental controls, spending limits, an easy refund process, and so on. 

Remember, the goal is steady and reliable customers, and that means customers who choose to keep coming back day in, day out, week in, week out like my former boss. His kids loved a certain studio’s F2P children-aimed games. He would give his kids their weekly allowance in in-game currency since it’s what they wanted. Angry and upset customers don’t do that. There will always be some outliers (like parents who didn’t look at their own credit card bills for over six months before complaining), but we generally try to err on the side of forgiving customer mistakes because it means they stay happy and reliable customers.

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Source: askagamedev
<p>Selling to kids is always a hot topic, and the gaming industry is no exception. With the discussions of games geared toward them and monetizing said games, I would like to know your professional opinion on the topic. Thanks for answering!</p>

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